Category Archives: Exercise

Exercise After a Cancer Diagnosis



Exercise may be the furthest thing from your mind after a cancer diagnosis; however, exercise that focuses on functional fitness will help you carry out the activities of daily living and return to the activities you enjoy.  A well-designed program can also decrease side effects and improve quality of life.

Each person is unique and heals differently. Moreover, there are many types of cancers, treatments and late-term side effects, each one affecting survivors in different ways. It is important, therefore, to work with a cancer exercise specialist or possibly a physical therapist who can design the best program for your unique situation and fitness level. Check with your physician or other specialist tracking your survivorship care for recommendations of qualified exercise providers.

For people who were active before surgery, it is imperative to slowly work back up to the previous level of activity. It is not wise to go back to a gym and continue with a pre-cancer exercise routine. Cancer survivors need to have patience; returning to your pre-cancer fitness level takes time and cannot be rushed. It is important to understand the implications of your particular surgery and the corrective exercises needed to improve recovery.

Some cancer survivors will need to exercise under supervision while others will be able to exercise independently. The type and scope of cancer and your overall medical condition and fitness level will determine whether a supervised program is needed. Even if you don’t need supervision, finding a program, either individual or small group, will help you to achieve your goals in a warm, friendly setting. The camaraderie and support of a small group can make taking care of your health enjoyable and fun.
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Integrative Allopathic and Eastern Medicine:
It’s Just Good Practice

When someone comes to see me I’m not just interested in the physical dimensions, I’m interested in all of the other dimensions.

I see my patients as a whole, as a whole woman, as a whole person.

The concept of an integrated approach, which is evidence-based is a powerful antidote to a lot of the stress that health consumers feel.  And it was a relief to me to also practice what I believe.

Evidence-based means that there is medical literature, there are clinical studies that have been done that show that whatever we’re talking about, whether or not it’s mindful, it’s medication or Tamoxifen is a safe and effective therapy.

 

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The Block Program’s New Year’s Resolutions for Cancer Patients

2017 has arrived, so it’s time to get going and keep going with good, uncomplicated New Year’s resolutions. But facing several helpful lifestyle changes that can produce better health for cancer patients, it might be hard to decide what to work on first. We’ll address that problem by suggesting three major priorities for cancer patients this year. If you use these for your resolutions, you’ll be taking concrete steps to improve your overall health and ability to tolerate and respond to cancer treatment.

Resolution 1: Eat an anti-inflammatory diet

healthy lifestyleInflammation in your body is a major driver of cancer growth. That’s the primary motivation to reduce excess inflammation. But that’s not all inflammation does. Inflammatory molecules called cytokines also contribute to cancer-induced fatigue, the most widespread side effect plaguing cancer patients. Of course, there are drugs and supplements that fight inflammation, but eating a diet that promotes inflammation at the same time you are trying to reduce it by taking supplements or drugs is like trying to run up a down escalator! Continue reading