Category Archives: Nutrition

Lion’s Mane Mushroom



The Lion’s mane mushroom, Hericium ericanceus, is an edible mushroom that has received increasing amounts of attention over the past ten years. Most notably, research suggesting that the whole mushroom—including both the root-like mycelium and the fruitbody, when extracted with heat and alcohol—can support both our immune and neurological systems.

The nerves of our bodies are constantly sending signals back and forth from our brains to our bodies. All of this activity means that our nerve cells use a tremendous amount of glucose and nutrients as compared to other tissues like muscle and organs. Some of these nutrients can be obtained from a diet of proteins, poly-unsaturated fats, green vegetables and fruits and berries. Lion’s Mane, however, provides compounds that can’t be found anywhere else. And these compounds are remarkable in their range of support.

Lion’s Mane has numerous specialized compounds derived from both the root-like mycelia and the fruitbody. Some unique alcohol-soluble metabolites support neurological tissue while other water-soluble polysaccharides support our innate immune system of natural killer cells and macrophages. Even more compounds act as prebiotics and feed our probiotic microflora. Lion’s Mane is a functional food that provides basic nutrients including complete, vegetarian proteins, vitamins and minerals. It’s a powerhouse of nutrients that can benefit your whole body when taken daily.

The studies on Lion’s mane show promise in regards to immunity, cognitive functioning, mood, memory and nerve functioning. And interestingly, some of the studies look at how Lion’s Mane’s compounds called hericinones from the fruitbody and erinacenes from the mycelia support cognitive functioning in an aging population. Study participants took Lion’s Mane for two to three weeks before noticing improvement. The improvements lasted throughout the duration of the study and for about three to four weeks after the study ended. After the studies ended, there was a gradual return over four weeks to pre-study level of functioning. What this tells us is that Lion’s Mane is not a magic wand. It’s a functional food that provides our bodies with key nutrients that support ongoing neurological functioning.

In order to maintain the most effective neurological system possible, the constant signaling that occurs in our nervous system demands that we provide our bodies with the nutrients that will support it. Daily intake of Lion’s Mane mycelia and fruitbody can provide your brain and nervous system with unique specialized nutrients that nourish and nurture your body and mind.

By: Jerry Angelini

 

Supportive Research:

Int J Med Mushrooms. 2012;14(5):427-46.

Neuroregenerative potential of lion’s mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (higher basidiomycetes), in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury (review).

Wong KH, Naidu M, David RP, Bakar R, Sabaratnam V.

 

Fiziol Zh. 2003;49(1):38-45.

The influence of Hericium erinaceus extract on myelination process in vitro.

Kolotushkina EV, Moldavan MG, Voronin KY, Skibo GG.

 

 

Chin J Integr Med. 2014 Aug 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers., a medicinal mushroom, activates peripheral nerve regeneration.

Wong KH1, Kanagasabapathy G, Naidu M, David P, Sabaratnam V.

 

 

Drugs Fut 2008, 33(2): 149: ISSN 0377-8282, Copyright 2008 Prous Science

Compounds for dementia from Hericium erinaceum

Kawagishi, H., Zhuang, C.

 

 

Biomed Res. 2010 Aug;31(4):231-7.

Reduction of depression and anxiety by 4 weeks Hericium erinaceus intake.

Nagano M, Shimizu K, Kondo R, Hayashi C, Sato D, Kitagawa K, Ohnuki K.

 

 

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol. 5, pp. 181–193 (2003)

Potentiation of Cell-Mediated Host Defense Using Fruit Bodies and Mycelia of Medicinal Mushrooms

Paul Stamets

 

 

Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre: Volume 2, Issue 1, July 2013, Pages 45–64

Non-digestible long chain beta-glucans as novel prebiotics

Ka-Lung Lam, Peter Chi-Keung Cheung,

Inflammation and Cancer

Evidence of the ability of inflammation to both initiate and fuel cancer has been accumulating since at least the 1980s.  In fact, any chronic inflammatory disease – such as arthritis, bronchitis, fasciitis, colitis, and asthma – can increase the risk of cancer.  For example, according to a 2000 study, approximately one in every ten patients with ulcerative colitis will eventually develop colorectal cancer.  By another estimate, chronic inflammation may precede at least one-third of all cancers.  However, it isn’t just the risk of cancer that is a concern when chronic inflammation is present.

inflammation and cancer

A study published in the May 2009 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology demonstrated that patients with high blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) were two to three times more likely to die prematurely or have their cancer return than patients with lower levels. Continue reading

Is Cancer a Chronic Illness, Not a Death Sentence?

You Can Survive With Cancer as a Chronic Illness

Too often cancer is thought of as a death sentence; a terminal illness.

“Survivors” may not be cancer free. Many people actually live long term with cancer as a chronic illness.

What does that mean? It means cancer may not be 100% eliminated. But it may be under control. Just as the way diabetes or high blood pressure are chronic illnesses that can be managed effectively while maintaining quality of life.

There are cancer cells present in your body. They are quiet, inactive and dormant. They are not doing anything or going anywhere. And they probably won’t kill you if you have a plan.

My Outsmart Cancer programs are a plan that you can rely on. They are designed to create a body where cancer cannot thrive.

You can change the soil in your garden to produce healthy plants and avoid weeds and diseased plants. In the same way, you want to change the terrain inside of your body so that you do not grow cancer cells.

You can create a physiology that does not support the development, progression or spread of cancer.

I am asked the same two big questions over and over:illness, vegetables, supplements, broccoli

What should I eat?
and
Which nutritional and herbal supplements should I take?

I have written a simple guide that not only answers these questions but also gives you food lists, sample meals, menus and recipes.

My guide also lists the most important supplements which will support your physiology to its maximum potential.

This is the best way to get started.

By: Dr Nalini Chilkov